home
cars by country
UK cars
HRG history
HRG le Mans lightweight
HRG 1100 cc
HRG 1500cc                
HRG photo album

 


HRG


 

It is astounding how the HRG marque has slipped into such obscurity. The result of a split between HR Godfrey and Frazer Nash, the HRG was in all respects a far better car than the 'Nash. I have owned a Blackburn engined Nash as well as an HRG and I know which I would rather keep! The HRG was engineered with real forethought.

Maintenance was a snip. One could remove the entire body within half an hour and access every part of the car. The HRG always felt 'tight' and handled like a dream. There was a tendency however in very wet weather to lose the use of a front brake drum if driven through a puddle. Quickly one learned to try the brakes every time a splash was heard! Performance from the Singer engine was good but therein lies a tale. Singer engine blocks did not last very long....at the time we would always say that they should have stuck with sewing machines! Without any notice whatsoever, the block would crack and it would be yet another strip-down to have it 'stitched'. This was required three times by myself alone.

If the 1100cc car was good, the 1500 cc model was astounding. The 1500 'Alpine rally' being the most sought after. Car shows could be most irritating as many would mistake the car for a 'Nash!

HRG went on to experiment with 'aerodynamic' body shapes. They were constructed in a traditional manner on the standard ladder chassis which would of course flex. This resulted in rapid bodywork suicide. Apart from this, the design appeared to have been inspired by the 'little shed at the bottom of the garden'.

In the 1960s, it was still possible to obtain spares from the factory which one run by the redoubtable 'Miss Leather'. Yes, she was scary and kept Hurg owners very much in line. She also knew every single HRG part number and could recite the history of all of the 245 cars ever built.

The HRG was in my view one of the finest all-round British sports cars ever built.


the editor's 1947 1100cc 'Hurg' alongside his MG Pa